There are many stereotypes and misconceptions surrounding Judging Types and Perceiving Types in the Myers Briggs Personality Indicator. Of the sixteen personalities, Judging types are typically known to be dominant, decisive, and goal-oriented.

These are types that push for a certain outcome or want to set their mind to a particular outcome. When you read online, you see the Judging personality type described as organised, clutter free, and always on time. But do these things have anything to do with Judging at all? Let’s go over five Judging stereotypes and talk about the essence of Judging.

Judging stereotype #1

All Judging types live by the same specific rules or norms ex: always be on time, keep your room tidy, be polite

Judging types can have different rules and opinions about how to organise their surroundings and what rules to follow and which to be relaxed about

Judging types are different in that Practical Judging types like STJs tend to focus on their environmental organisation and Idealistic Judging types like the XNFJs tend to focus more on creating a harmonious social utopia or dream world.

Social judging types like the SFJs tend to emphasise how a person should speak or act towards their community and the intellectual judging types like the NTJs, it is more important to focus on how to reach long term goals.

Judging stereotype #2

Judging types are less open-minded than Perceiving types

Judging types need longer time to process and adjust to new information

As a Judging type, I can find it harder to notice new information and to adjust to changes around me. If someone changes something around me I might not even have any idea they did. If someone tells me about a new idea, I’ll be interested in it and want to know more, but it may take me a long time before I understand the idea or have time to deal with it. It goes into my infinite to-do list, and I will get to it as soon as I have time to spare. Though sometimes, I need a reminder.

Judging stereotype #3

All Judging types are managers, bosses or directors

Introverted Judging types tend to focus on being their own leaders

There’s a big difference between Extroverted Judging types and Introverted Judging types. While EXXJs tend to focus on managing their environment and the people around them, IXXJs tend to focus more on managing themselves and their own time. We do not like to manage other people because that means we have to leave our own comfort zone.

Judging stereotype #4

Judging types dislike individuality

Judging types find individuality stressful

If chaos or difficult individuals go against our plans, it leads to stress because we have to adjust our plans to factor in for the craziness or the unexpected event. This can however be very positive for us. As long as it’s not too overwhelming, healthy Judging types will appreciate individualists and free thinkers for their input and will roll with your punches and feedback.

Judging stereotype #5

Judging types can’t relax!

Judging types work first and play later

Judging types do enjoy relaxation and fun and can be easygoing, as soon as they’re done with their own chores or feel they have done what they set out to in a day. But they want to get rid of their to-do list first. If their to-do list is infinite, this can be a problem, and can make them appear overly serious or intense. But many Judging types live by shorter to-do lists and are better at setting day by day targets and making long-term projections.

Judging types like to push boundaries

The Judging type when taken to the extreme is a boundary-setter and challenger. Someone that is constantly pushing themselves to do better, go further, reach higher. Half-way there is not close enough! Almost is not finished.

The most Judging personality type of all is the Enneagram 8. Enneagram 8s can be almost extreme in how aggressive, direct, and forceful they are about what they want. They often make good entrepreneurs and businessmen. They can handle any interruptions and changes and rarely lose focus on what they want.

Watch my video:

Judging types as control freaks

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